Insurance Tips To Drive Someone Else’s Car

Insurance Tips To Drive Someone Else’s Car

Automobile insurance can offer an array of coverages. Mandatory insurance coverages vary by state but other optional coverage areas can include: medical coverage for expenses caused by a wreck, uninsured motorist which covers you if the other driver is uninsured, roadside assistance and many other useful coverages. This article can help you understand the options and choose wisely.

Remember that when it comes to coverages on your auto insurance policy, there are two that are mandatory. These are bodily injury and property damage liability. Also, if you have a new car that already has a loan, your company may require collision insurance in your policy. Other than that, the other coverages are optional.

You can also get some substantial discounts on your auto insurance policy premium if you have an “insurance friendly occupation”. Insurance companies watch occupation statistics very closely and if they know that workers in certain occupations tend to incur fewer losses, then they might be inclined to offer a special rate for them.

When buying car insurance, consider what coverage you actually need against what coverage is being recommended by the agent. If your car is worth less than about five thousand dollars, collision coverage is probably costing you more than what would pay out in an accident. However, property liability coverage is vital, as it protects you against having to pay out for damage to another party’s car or other property.

If you want to get the best deal on your auto insurance policy, work on your credit. Most states use your credit score to determine your premium, believing that individuals with a lower score are at a higher risk for accidents. Do everything you can to raise your score, and the cost of your insurance will drop as a result.

Your insurance should not be too expensive if you drive less than 7500 miles a year. You can drive less by taking public transportation instead, or by sharing rides with your coworkers. Make sure you can provide a proof to your insurance company that you drive under 7500 miles a year.

Taking the towing option off of your policy will save you money on your premiums. In the case of an accident, towing is generally covered even if you are not paying for the towing option. If you take care of your car and understand how to fix small problems like a flat tire, you will never need to use the towing option and can save yourself up to 30 dollars a year.

Consider changes you can make to your daily commute that could reduce the miles you drive. The shorter your commute is, the less your auto insurance will cost. For example, can you combine your drive time with public transit or carpooling? Can you work at home more often or travel for work less?

As previously summarized, there are many insurance options to choose from. Some are mandatory and some are simply additional useful coverages. This article can help you define the different coverage options and their costs and whether they are of value to you. By understanding this information, you can get the coverage you need.

Insurance Tips To Drive Someone Else's Car