Combined-Type ADHD

Combined-Type ADHD

In the category of hyperactivity/impulsivity, an individual must have six or more of the following symptoms: often fidgets while sitting, often leaves seat in structure setting, often runs around inappropriately (restlessness), often has trouble playing quietly, often talks excessively, often blurts out answers before question completed, often has difficulty waiting turn and often interrupts or intrudes on others. Some of these symptoms must have present before the age of seven, and they must have lasted for at least six months.
In the category of inattention, an individual must have six or more of the following symptoms: often makes careless mistakes in schoolwork, work and other activities, often has difficulty keeping attention sustained in task or play activities, often does not seem to listen when spoken to directly, often has difficulty organizing tasks and activities, often avoids and dislikes tasks that require sustained mental effort, often loses things that are necessary for everyday life, often is easily distracted by extraneous stimuli and often is forgetful in daily activities. Some of these symptoms must have been present before the age of seven, and they must have lasted at least six months.
The combined type of ADHD is actually the most common among ADHD sufferers. They are also the individuals most at risk for other negative problems in their lives due to the nature of the disorder. First of all, children with Combined Type ADHD have higher rates of conduct disorder. Parents who have a child with this type must constantly be on the lookout for problems in other arenas of their lives besides specific symptoms of ADHD. Just keep in mind that problems in the emotional, psychological and social domains are a result of a response to having ADHD, and not the disorder itself. The way your child acts can be changed with time and work.

Combined-Type ADHD